rescued dog

Would you answer the call?

It is said that when a person makes plans, God laughs. Last week, my week was planned. I knew what I would be doing and when. Over the years, I have become more flexible with my schedule, but I still have a schedule. Tuesday morning shifted my schedule. Most mornings my adopted dog Güera and I meet up with a neighbor and her dogs to walk. Tuesday was no different, until the dogs stopped by a field. When we came to the field, we found a severely dehydrated and malnourished dog.

Day One

We could have left. We both had work. We both had plans. We both had busy days. None of that seemed important anymore. A meditation teacher from Myanmar once said, “When the sunshine of loving-kindness meets the tears of suffering the rainbow of compassion appears.” The rainbow of compassion took hold of us, and we could not help but assist this dog. A mutual friend was called and arrived with water. Cautiously approaching the dog, for we did not know if it was vitious or diseased, we gave it two liters of water which it greedily ate up. The dog could not stand. It stretched with its neck to get to the water. Food was also brought but untouched. Later that day I returned with water which again was met with approval. The dog was about two feet from where it had been, but again showed no signs of being able to stand up or move freely.

Day Two

I had plans the next day, which were rearranged again to bring food and water to the little girl. Day two she was up a bit on her front paws, and she greedily ate everything we brought to her. Two meals were consumed within minutes. We were glad that she was looking a bit better, but she was obviously dragging her hind legs. We didn’t know if she was in an accident. We didn’t dare touch her, because we had no idea if she would bite us to protect herself.

Day Three

Day three, after again adjusting my plans, I fed her in the morning then returned in the afternoon with a different friend. We were thrilled to see that she was now using three of her legs. Having planned to bring her to a veterinarian that day for examination, when the time came, we did not have the courage. If her one leg was injured, it was quite possible that she might defend herself if there was pain when we picked her up. The trip to the vet did not happen, but I did get close enough to her to pet her. She accepted it calmly. Her eyes and demeanor clearly showed that she was not a threat.

Day Four

Friday, day four, after again shifting my schedule to accommodate this injured dog’s needs, I was accompanied by a dog trainer and some lovely people who often rescue dogs. We were all surprised to see Boxie, who had been named day two because she looked part boxer, was up on all four legs. Compared to how she had looked only a few days before this seemed a miracle. The current helpers were skillfully able to transport the dog to a very accommodating and supportive veterinarian who checked Boxie out. She did not have any major diseases and was just suffering from malnutrition and the normal bugs one would expect to find on a dog that was left in the wild. That evening Boxie came home with me because she had nowhere else to go. She is now recuperating at a shelter, as my own adopted dog was not adjusting well to our houseguest.

Besides a plug below requesting your help to find a home for this sweet girl, I also wanted to share some of the lessons this experience gave me.

The Pause: In my old Type A ways, had I rushed to get Boxie to a veterinarian the first day they may have put her down because of her condition, I would not have found the right people to help me move her, and I would not have found the shelter who took her in. Although it took conscious effort to not rush into things, every time I allowed myself to pause, the next right step appeared.

The Ego: I felt so much guilt the night after I brought Boxie to the shelter. It was not because she was not being cared for, but because I should have done it. I should have rescued her and taken her in. I was a bad person. All the guilt and remorse I felt was my ego taking on a role. I knew in my heart, not keeping her was the right thing for Boxie, my dog Güera, and our family. When I took away my expectations and judgments, I found serenity in my actions.

Purpose: My life had become pretty routine lately, and I felt trapped and unsatisfied in that routine. When faced with an opportunity to do something new and to help someone else, it gave my life purpose. When I could put aside my schedule, the flexibility gave me the ability to connect with others, help save a life, and bring together a community of support. #TeamBoxie

As you go about your week, keep your eye out for opportunities to help others, act as guided when you receive intuition, remove egoistic expectations and judgments, and rediscover your deeper purpose for living.

If you are interested in helping Boxie find her forever home, please contact me or Rescate Perruno. Rescue dogs are routinely sent from Los Cabos, Mexico to the USA and Canada. We’d love to show you how easy it would be to have this darling become part of your family.

Midlife Rebirth

I stumbled upon another brilliant talk from Brené Brown. Not sure what the full interview was about, but what was shared here is about the growth that comes midlife when we realize that most everything we have been working toward doesn’t make us happy. Whether you are in a midlife crisis, or in your 20’s and choosing your path, she has some sage advice. Here are some things that resonated with me.

Know Your Theme

Like any good fictional character, I believe we all have a theme, a challenge that we work through in this lifetime. Our key challenge usually centers around similar issues which we are here to learn and grow from. What is your whole life defined by? My lifepath is an exploration of self-awareness, self-acceptance, self-love, and self-empowerment. Whether in my personal relationships, my career, or even my health, every obstacle in my path usually relates to one of these themes. Knowing that we have a theme can help us get out of the weeds, see things from a broader perspective, approach worldly challenges differently, and see our life in an expansive way.

Let Go to Grow

We learn a lot of tactics in our youth to survive when we have little choice in matters. That is all well and good. What becomes a problem is taking these survival tactics, our armor, into our adulthood. Oftentimes what protects us in youth, no longer serves us in adulthood. When we see this intellectually, it may still be difficult to release these old tools and tactics, but when we can, we open the door to growth and becoming who we are truly meant to be.

Define Your Joy

As I started my midlife rebirth decades ago, this was the first lesson I embraced. When we can stop looking at our peers, our families, and our communities for what is prescribed as the best life, we can begin to explore what really makes us happy. Taking the time to discover, define, and accept what makes you you can help you make better choices as to where you spend your time and energy.

Enjoy the Ordinary

In our youth, we look for accomplishment and acclaim for our worth. As life provides us with trials and challenges, we begin to be grateful for the ordinary moments. It is hard to imagine someone going through the past year and not now being grateful to move about freely or to hug their loved ones. Unfortunately, it often takes tragedy and hardship to help us realize what really matters.

Share Your Gifts

Once you stop playing society’s game and embrace yourself and your purpose, have the courage to share it with the world. There is only one you. You may have something the world is to receive. Maybe it is just something for your community or family, but there is a light, a gift you are here to share. Stop holding yourself back. Embrace you. Embrace your purpose. Gift it to the world.

What is your experience of midlife rebirth? Share with us.

looking into the future

Be the Change

As we move into the new year, many of us have historically created new years’ resolutions. After 2020, we may just be praying to survive, tentatively embracing the unknown. For me, instead of just enduring the new year, my goal is to live purposefully. Inspired by the book, Becoming Better Grownups, I want to live every day making the world just a little bit better.

Tiny Nudges

I seem to have always had a drive to make the world better, to help those around me. Many times, this passion has been a hindrance. It manifested in an expectation that I could and should change the world. I felt a responsibility to make everything peaceful, fair, and just. Obviously, this is a tall order and not within my ability.  Two recent learnings are helping me refocus my desire to save the world.

First, I don’t know what is right. When I was young, I thought I knew right and wrong, good and bad. I thought my way was the right way. What I now know is that there is no absolute right and wrong. What is best can change depending on the circumstance. Sometimes what I believe is the best option, sometimes it is not. I have set aside my immature notion that I know right from wrong or even that there is an absolute right and wrong. I have learned to pause and wait for clear direction and to not act on my ego-filled judgements.

Second, a concept Brad Montague expresses deftly in his book, is that change does not come across in grand gestures. It is not LaRusso winning the championships, Bruce Willis defeating Hans Gruber, or one single amazing event that changes the world in an instant. Change happens slowly through almost microscopic shifts – the kind word on the right day, a reminder of an inspirational book, sharing experience strength and hope. A tiny nudge in the right direction can be one in a line of many small efforts that lead to the big change. Evolution happens slowly over time and so does changing personally and globally for the better.

Make the World Awesome

Instead of looking at what you can do for money or what will impress your friends, live your life by creating awesome wherever you go. What are you good at? What are you passionate about? What do you do instinctively without even trying?  If you focused on using your inherent talents for good, how could you make the world more awesome? Maybe it would be a new vaccine. Maybe it would be a way to make home schooling easier. Maybe it would be an awesome piece of entertainment to bring joy to others.

Don’t look at what the world needs. When I do this, I think of things that need to be done but I personally have no ability to do them. First look to your passion. What is like breathing to you? What can you not help yourself from doing?  Maybe you will know immediately how your inherent skill will help others, maybe you will uncover that over time. Either way, start with you and have the courage to share your special gift with the world.

As we move into 2021, won’t you join me in living a more purposeful life? Dig deep, uncover, and accept what you are uniquely created to do. Have the courage to share that talent with the world. And know that your small efforts will be part of a chain reaction of efforts which will bring about good in the world.

Wishing you all a happy, safe, healthy, and inspiring new year!

Susyn Reeve

Leading an Inspired Life – Susyn Reeve

Are you leading an inspired life?  A life where you are fulfilling your passion and purpose.  A life where your unique gifts support and give to others.  Susyn Reeve hopes so and if you are not, she can show you how.

Susyn Reeve
Susyn Reeve

With 40 years of experience as a Leadership & Executive Development Coach & Mentor and Self Esteem Expert, Susyn Reeve helps individuals from Fortune 100 companies as well as physicians, attorneys, and educators find their Inspired List.  She now also supports those looking for their inspired life through her best-selling book, The Inspired Life:  Unleashing Your Mind’s Capacity for Joy, and her radio show, The On Purpose Show: Your Path to Fulfilling LifeWork.

During this engaging show, we talk about our core inherent purposes, how to uncover them, accept them, and manage their transformation over time.  Susyn and I discuss how to avoid regret and attacking ourselves for wasted time so we can focus on starting to live our inspired life now.  Susyn provides examples of others who found that their “outside” success was unfulfilling propelling them toward finding their inherent purpose-driven success.  Learn how commitment, intent, and acknowledgement can lead you to the life you dream about.

If you find yourself unhappy with your current life and career, listen in to learn how you too can find your passion-filled, purpose-based inspired life.

If success was guaranteed, what would you be doing?